Is anyone thinking of their "Fall Garden" Yet?

I have just had to pull up my onions rather early as they all bolted but, I did manage to save most of them so they are now in the greenhouse drying, but this has left a bare raised bed and so am now contemplating what to sow next…

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Glad to hear you were able to rescue most of your onions, Susie. Mine, along with almost everything else, went in late so my ‘earlies’ are still either growing or fruiting. I’m sowing Savoys, Winter and Spring cabbage and broccoli and another (yet another!) batch of beetroot as well as leeks for when the peas/beans etc are finished. Onion-wise, my Fen Early sets are swelling well but the Sturon have a bit to go yet.

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My white ones are still going strong, they are in the shadier part of the garden, just goes to show that the good old micro climate thing is true, the red ones were at the top of the garden in the sunniest bit…

I’ve never had any success with Red Onions - Red Baron - and I’m giving up on them - they never get past sprouting. It’s only the colour and you can’t eat colour! Re the tree - my Gage has some sprouts from the base and one of the branches looks keen. My Fen Early Onions were really hammered by the wind and have keeled over at the neck - hope they recover. Sturon are still slow to get moving but look healthy enough.
As an aside, have you ever tried Broccoletto? My seedlings went stringy and then flowered before they ever got started. All the best .

I’ve been babying my Celeriac for the winter garden. After a few weeks of not looking strong, they are finally taking off. I just planted leeks and have high hopes. They’ve done well for me in the past. I’m planning on planting cabbage, broccoli and kale in the next week or so. I’ll then put hoops over top and cover with floating row cover to keep the caterpillar moths off. Then when the weather cools down and into winter, I’ll put plastic over the hoops. I’ve had success doing this in the last 3-4 years with with leeks and kale. Hoping to get bit more this year so I don’t have to go out as much…Covid, after all.

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That sounds like a plan! I have little kale seedlings and am thinking of leeks and all the salad greens. I usually plant onions too that go through the winter, but this year I fancy doing something different too, never really tried turnips so might give them a try.

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I’ve got some of my swede/rutabaga seedlings in, with a few more waiting in the wings to plant when I pull up the last few kohlrabi. The Brussels sprouts are well established for a winter crop. The leeks have been in the ground for a couple of months too, scattered through the flowerbeds because I sowed too many seeds and couldn’t bear to throw all those healthy seedlings away (I never learn)! I’m just about to sow more carrots and beetroot too, hopefully they’ll have time enough to grow before the end of the season.

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Hi there, Ms Veggie. Got it right this time. My swedes are now in, along with some turnips in the gaps around various beds. The almost continuous light rain (6-7/7/2020) is helping - I think! I have the temp satisfaction of seeing all my beds full of both mature, maturing and adolescent plants but not much time for drawing breath yet.
At the weekend, it’s about sowing some of the Winter/Spring seeds. Now is soon the time to tidy up after (in septuagenarian terms) an outburst of energy and effort to look beyond the beds.
You’ve made me a bit anxious as my kohlrabi (a new one for me) plants, yet young, have just gone in. Can I expect maturity later in the year?
Like you, I’m looking for gaps to use up decent plants - I do so hate to compost them!
Given an fair few spares away.
(Don’t you just ‘hate it’ when the recipients report far better results that you’re getting yourselfemphasized text!! There’s no obvious ‘justice’ for the poor gardener!)**
My last lot of beetroot seedlings are the best so far though those weedy ones that I planted, regardless, in the beds a fortnight ago are beginning to flex their muscles at last. Thankfully, beetroot are almost an all the year round crop and so hopefully, yours and mine will be fine in the end. My leeks are still nascent but they seem to be determined to ‘do something’. I’ll be sowing some ‘follow on’ leeks soon.
All the best, sis’.

Kohlrabi are great, they look so exotic that you think they must be hard but are in fact one of the easiest veggies to grow and yes, I am certain you will do well with it. They are also really tasty, the name means turnip cabbage in German ( I think) and it does straddle that taste divide but is lovely to cook with too. Just keep an eye out for cabbage aphids and be on hand with a hose pipe on jet!

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You can sow kohlrabi from late spring to midsummer or thereabouts, so don’t worry, you’re not late @laner8673. Yours might actually do better than mine - I’ve had a couple of them split due to the dry weather followed by heavy rain, and I noticed today that one has bolted too.

I don’t know why I keep growing it to be honest because I’m still struggling to find a good way to eat it! It’s all right thinly sliced or grated in salads but I find the taste a bit ‘meh’. I’ve come to the conclusion that my expectations are too high - they look so crazy I expect the taste to be out of this world too! :laughing:

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I’m hoping it’s not too late to start the winter brassicas again. I had lovely trays of kale, Brussels, caulis, red cabbages, Savoys almost ready to be planted out and stupidly left the gate open into the veg patch while I popped up to the house. Got held up in the house and went back to find the geese had had a wonderful feast and I had trays of stalks. Not one left.

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What can one say?
Cabbage Whites did this to me last year.
‘POR’-press on regardless,bro’
What else is there?
You’ll get there!
My winter brassicas have gone on a couple of days ago.
Every good wish

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I have sown some more parsnips and swede alongside the ones that are already in. I’m hoping to “extend the season” but can you tell I’m winging it a bit?

One lot of my cabbages have been at the mercy of the cabbage whites and my kale seedlings are almost all decimated.

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Yep, mine have been got at too despite netting, winging it is fun you never know what will come out of an experiment…

Hi there, Mrs Jones. With the world’s climate being totally up the creek, it is worth ‘winging’ it for the cost of a few seeds. Both will stand the winter and so - who knows - you could be picking them in late Spring!! The weather has been such a maul in our part of the UK Midlands that we won’t be surprised if we are sunbathing in November!!
Cabbage white - persistent little monsters. I lost my entire first batch of brassica seedlings last year when a couple got into my seedling growhouse unnoticed. I find the only way is to net - either mesh of something like debris netting. Bird netting just doesn’t cut it.
The only other remedy is to daily inspect under all the leaves and that can be a right chore.
Why not ’wing it’ again and sow some Winter brassicas. It’s on the edge of late but it’s well worth a try. My Winter brassica seedlings are just showing.

Instead of my netting which came off and got tangled up I have resorted to checking our brassicas and wiping off the little yellow eggs of the cabbage whites, strangely satisfying so far…

I tried hand-picking off the cabbage white eggs last year for the first time in years and it took so much time the crop wasn’t worth the effort for me. I’ve returned to using veggiemesh tunnels with the netting held down using planks and bricks again this year. I’ve never had it come off, even though my garden gets pretty windy at times.

It probably is better, in fact I know it is, it came off in a thunderstorm and I untangled it let it dry out on the line and then couldn’t be bothered to put it back on. I only have 10 broccoli plants, if they were cabbages (much more time consuming to check) I would have put it back on but so far hand picking seems to be working (ish).

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