'Exotics' under cover - UK?

We’ve been offered an additional 10x8 greenhouse which are hoping to soon receive.
Can you grow peaches, citrus, apricots in a cool/warm greenhouse in the UK Midlands climate (weather)?
Any tips would be welcome.
This is a new gardening adventure for us with no previous experience.

Grab it with both hands and then worry about that later! But yes some of those are practical and others not so, citrus all types definitely, peaches are difficult as they seem to take so long to ripen in our climate and apricots prefer to be outside in a really sheltered spot against a house wall. In my experience they get too damp from condensation inside a greenhouse. But there are lots of other things you can grow and you could even have things like peppers growing all year round as perennials…

Lucky you! What about grapes? You could try growing your own wine! :wine_glass:

Hi, I’m not sure what your hardiness zone is there. Where I live in France, we are zone 6 (down to -25°C) and we successfully grow apricots and peaches both outside as normal sized trees and in a greenhouse as dwarf (1.5m) trees. In the greenhouse they tend to flower very early and there are not usually many insects about, so hand pollination is necessary. Then you will often find you’ve been too successful and the horrid task of thinning becomes essential.
Citrus-wise, lemons, navel oranges, clementines all overwinter in the greenhouse but live outside from last frost until first frost. Feeding, watering, watering and watering are all musts.
As for grapes, I’m not sure you’d harvest enough grapes from one vine (and that’s about all you’d fit in there) to make 2 glasses of wine. You could grow hops over the greenhouse and brew your own beer…
Good luck, whatever you choose.

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Dear Ms Veggie.
I have rather neglected my 3, 2yr old grape vines in the scrabble to get the beds planted but all 3 have (thankfully) refused to surrender to my faults. I am now hopefully awaiting the new (s/h) 10x8 greenhouse where they will get ‘pride of place’. I have to admit that wine I am not interested in (I am a hops and Scotch person) but if I can provide ‘her indoors’ with some desert grapes, it will be a success.
2 have got potential bunches but I am not holding my breath.

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Greetings across the channel, Bro’.
You’re giving me romantic dreams.
The UK Mids weather isn’t exactly perfect for citrus but I’ve sown some nectarines and peaches seeds/pips and - if we get the second greenhouse - who knows?
Are French meteorologists giving you any clues why the weather is daft?
We just put up with daily changing forecasts with no explanations at all.
Good wishes over there

That sounds great, I have a very old Black Hamburg vine in the greenhouse, well he is well over 30 at least and has 5 good bunches on him but I have a newbie outside who is supposed to be scrambling artfully over a pergola but is pretty slow about it, however that one has one little tiny bunch of grapes on it too in Yorkshire, outside so I am very excited!

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Bonjour Monsieur Laner, no, there doesn’t seem to be a reason for the peculiar weather, although it continues. I’ve lived here for nine years and have not experienced a July that has been cool (by my Australian standards summers under 30°C are cool, under 25°C, positively cold) and wet! Showers in July! We could be heading into August with green grass in all of our fields
I wonder if it may have something to do with the international shutdown we have experienced, in some form or another, since March. Almost no flights, very limited road traffic and rail transport, reduced electricity production with many factories being closed. Has the reduction in pollution given Mother Earth a chance to breathe and try to correct herself? Perhaps it’s all coincidence.
Good luck with your grapevines, I hope you can manage some fruit for your wife. It’s always been too much faffing about for me, the pruning three times a year, two sets of thinning. My late father busied himself with vines and produced some lovely bunches for our tables. Mum will let them be ornamental and leave any fruit for the birds.
As for the romantic dreams, maybe no camembert before bed? And, like Miss that.vegetablist, I, too, am a lady-person. Is there a generic, non-gender-specific Midlands appellation, like ‘‘my friend’’? Best wishes for a great weekend.

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Sorry about the gender blunder. You could be right about less pollution and all that. Our greatest enemy over here have been the winds - sometimes predicted as strong or storms but sometimes strong squalls coming unexpected out of nowhere.
A common S.Derbyshire, South Yorks and East Staffs appellation is simply - ‘Mi duck.’
A common greeting might well be - “Ayupp, mi duck!?” which, being translated comes out as something like “Hello, friend, how are you?”
Don’t ask me where that comes from - haven’t a clue.
Best wishes across the stream.

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